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Under Queensland’s Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Act 2002 gamba grass is a declared Class 2 pest - land managers must take reasonable steps to keep land free of the species and it is an offence to introduce, keep or supply the species without a permit. 

In 2012 Gamba grass was declared a Weed of National Significance. 

Community partnerships are the key to great results

Cape York NRM hosted a Soils and Weed Solutions Field Day in Cooktown on 29 February.

The hands-on event, aimed at growers and graziers, explored the latest thinking on sustainable solutions to the ongoing challenge of weed and soil management.

The event brought together members of two Cape York agriculture and grazing networks—the Endeavour and Normanby Mixed Farming and Grazing communities.

Words Sandra Lloyd | Photo Cape York NRM

Freshwater rivers and creeks in northern Australia have cultural, environmental and economic value. These values are under threat because of introduced species including Pond Apple, Gamba Grass and feral pigs.

Words and photo Juliana Foxlee

I am here to help with anything agriculture – that’s the message for Cape York’s agricultural community from Cape York NRM’s Regional Agriculture Landcare Facilitator, Andrew Hartwig.

Words Robyn May | Photo Jessie Price-Decle

Cape York grazing families didn’t let a little thing like a Cat 1 cyclone deter them from heading to the 2019 Cape York Grazing Forum held in Laura recently

Cape York NRM ran the event in partnership with South Cape York Catchments, Rural Financial Counselling Services North Queensland, AgForce, Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries, and was a great success. 

Graziers from across the Cape travelled to Laura for the two-day event and thankfully Cyclone Anne lost her way and was a no-show.

Thanks to funding from a combination of programs, Andrew Hartwig from Cape York NRM recently coordinated aerial burning across a number of Cape York properties.

The early burns were designed to reduce fuel loads and connect fire breaks on a landscape-wide scale, and were carried out by Cape York NRM in partnership with South Cape York Catchments and Cape York Weeds and Feral Animals Inc.

Words Juliana Foxlee | Photo Andrew Brooks

Cape York NRM and Northern Gulf Resource Management Group are working with graziers in the Mitchell catchment to help them develop their knowledge of native vegetation management in a bid to reduce erosion. 

Cape York NRM Acting Principal Program Manager Michael Goddard is managing the project. 

‘This project aims to substantially reduce the amount of sediment flowing into the Normanby, and as a result, improve water quality in the Northern Great Barrier Reef,’

Recently, grade 12 student Ella Hartwig took on a volunteer position with Cape York NRM to help deliver a coordinated burn project on Cape York. Here’s her record of her experience. Ella’s dad Andrew, known to us all as Andy, is Cape York NRM’s Regional Agriculture Landcare Facilitator (RALF). Andy coordinated the multi-property early burning program in partnership with South Cape York Catchments and Cape York Weeds and Feral Animals Inc.

Cape York NRM and Terrain NRM Enhanced Extension Coordination in Reef Catchments project aims to change land management practice in order to improve the water quality of the northern Great Barrier Reef.

Words and photo Robyn May

Rubber vine has been treated in the Laura region by Cape York Weeds and Feral Animals (CYWAFA) Inc. with support from Cape York NRM.

Cape York NRM Gully and Grazing Project Officer Michael Goddard said the project was all about restoring native ground cover and reducing erosion.

‘The Laura River Rubber Vine Control Project is reducing the amount of rubber vine growing along the waterways, allowing the return of native grasses and minimising soil loss during rain events,’ he explained.

Jalunji-Warra Land and Sea Country

(excerpt)

The Cape York Peninsula Pest Management Strategy (CYPPMS) is a broad over-arching document that establishes a Cape-wide planning framework for integrated pest management by government, community, industry and individuals. The Strategy and action plans have been developed with community consultation to help achieve a coordinated and effective approach to pest management throughout Cape York Peninsula.

This plan outlines the sustainable land management practices for Brumby Hollow over 4 years. Objectives are:

  1. to prevent the introduction of any new weed species on the property or new infestations of existing species in new areas;
  2. all high priority weeds to be reduced in area and/or reduced in density of current infestations;
  3. to contain or reduce in area all medium priority weeds; and,
  4. to reduce the number of feral animals within 5 years. 

Cape York Natural Resource Management (Cape York NRM), Cook Shire Council (CSC), Weipa Town Authority, Wujal Wujal, Hopevale, Lockhart, Mapoon, Napranum, Aurukun, Pormpuraaw and Kowanyama Aboriginal Shire Councils and the Northern Peninsula Area Regional Council (NPARC) have collaboratively developed this Regional Biosecurity Plan (the Plan) for Cape York Peninsula. The development of the Plan has been the culmination of extensive consultation with Cape York Peninsula communities, Traditional Owners and all levels of government.

The plan has been prepared to protect the economy and environment of “Jim’s Joint” from the adverse impacts of weeds and feral animals. Objectives to be achieved within the life of the plan (4 years) are: 1) To prevent the introduction of any new weeds in the next 4 years; 2) To reduce in area all high priority weeds and/or to reduce the density of current infestations; 3) To contain or reduce medium and low priority weeds within 4 years; and, 4) To reduce the number of feral animals within 4 years

This plan aims to protect the economy and environment of Bunata from the adverse impacts of weeds and feral animals.The objectives for weed and feral animal management in Bunata over the next 4 years are:

  1. All high priority weeds are reduced in area and density;
  2. Other weeds are contained or reduced in area;
  3. Prevent the spread of existing weeds and the introduction of any new weeds onto our property; and
  4. To reduce the number of feral animals within the life of the plan.

The plan represents a workable pest management program which identifies, combats and eradicates declared environmental pest plants and feral animals for Julery Pastoral. The goal of the pest management plan is to guarantee the land is managed in a sustainable way which ensures economical and environment viability.

To manage the land of Butchers Hill Station, in a sustainable way, by controlling weeds and pest animals on the property, and ensuring it’s economic and environmental viability continues into the future. The objectives for weed and feral animal management in Butchers Hill Station over the next 4 years are:

This plan provides a sustainable land management program for Maitland Downs, to control weeds and pest animals on the property, to ensure it’s economic and environmental viability continues into the future.

On day one of the regional workshop, participants used their knowledge of individual species to identify the major and minor regional threats that are affecting each species. On day two of the regional workshop, species were grouped by major threats.

The Cape York Peninsula Pest Management Plan (CYPPMP) establishes a Cape-wide planning framework for integrated pest management by Government, Community, Industry and Individuals. The plan and action plans have been developed with community consultation to help achieve a coordinated and effective approach to pest management throughout Cape York Peninsula (CYP).

The overall vision of the feral pig management strategy is to use best practice
management to minimise the impact of feral pigs on the environment, economy and
health of Queensland.
The strategy is intended to achieve five outcomes:
(1) The community accepts that feral pigs are an issue for the community as a whole.
(2) Feral pigs are managed effectively.
(3) Resources are used effectively and strategically through collaborative and
coordinated pest management planning.

This poster outlines the objectives, location, strategy, planned outcomes, and implementation of the Laura Ranger's Weed Management Strategy.